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Monthly Archives: May 2019

Why Iloilo should be proud of its past leaders

“We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves.”

–Buddha

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

NEW YORK CITY– THIS is a tribute to the late Ilonggo philosopher-lawyer Ernesto “Ernie” Dayot, 86, popularly known as “the Socrates of Iloilo”, a dyed-in-the-wool follower of Ayn Rand’s “Objectivist” philosophy and was a one-time a deist like his most favorite philosopher, Voltaire.
If it were Salvador “Doy” Laurel, instead of Mrs. Corazon “Cory” Aquino, who became president via EDSA Revolution in 1986, Ilonggo lawyer Ernesto “Ernie” Justiniani Dayot would have been appointed as chairman of the National Historical Commission of the Philippines (NHCP).
“Or, panyero Ernie would have been given an ambassadorial position,” the late lawyer Joselito “JT” Barrera once told a group of journalists, while hosting then visiting senatorial candidate Frank Chavez.
Barrera was one of the few Ilonggos privy to Dayot’s closeness with the late former Vice President Laurel, the fifth Prime Minister of the Philippines until his position was abolished.
Barrera said Laurel was most impressed with Dayot in one of the Nacionalista Party (NP) events they both had attended because of the latter’s intellect and photographic memory especially when narrating historical events.
When Laurel was secretary of the Department of Foreign Affairs from March 1986 to February 1987, he would invite Dayot and other Ilonggo NP leaders to a private dinner.
“Politics was mentioned occasionally during the private dinner, but we talked mostly about our girlfriends,” lawyer Pascual Espinosa Jr., founder of the Save Our Nation Movement, said in jest.
Dayot always believed in the power of the Ilonggos to excel in arts, science, academics, sports and politics.SUPREMACY

“The Ilonggos have always strove to regain their economic supremacy like in the past when the port of Iloilo was at its busiest and that time Iloilo City was dubbed the ‘Queen City of the South,’” Dayot averred.
Dayot, a native of Dingle, Iloilo but resided in Brgy. Nanga, Guimbal, Iloilo until his death, had identified “a major stumbling block” in the Filipino politicians’ propensity to engage in patronage politics.
Delays in implementation of big projects were blamed for the snail pace of Iloilo’s development in the past.
“Delayed construction of the infrastructure like roads and bridges has taken a heavy toll with the viability of other economic projects government or private that could set high the gear of production for the ultimate progress of Iloilo,” he lamented.
Because of this, Dayot stressed that the economic growth of the province and city had to depend on the management of the powers-that-be.
He pointed out that there is the linkage of the economic growth and the political power, a kind of partnership most common and prevalent in developing countries.
“Like horse and carriage, they are complimentary,” Dayot said.
Like many Ilonggos, Dayot believes that there are more positive and great things to be proud of in the city and province of Iloilo, which boast of intellectual and political landmarks.

ILONGGOS

He cited the following achievements of Ilonggos:
-Molo was called “the Athens of the Philippines” as it produced senators and jurists in the land and abroad;
-Chief Justices Victoriano Mapa and Ramon Avancena graced the Supreme Court of the Philippines;
-Raymundo Melliza sat in the Cuban court;
-Delfin Jaranilla was appointed after the war in the international tribunal that tried war criminals;
-the three senators produced by Molo district, Iloilo City were Rodolfo Ganzon, Esteban de La Rama, Jose C. Zulueta;
-other Ilonggo senators were Fernando Lopez, who became vice president; Oscar Ledesma, Ruperto Montinola, Tomas Confesor, who became a famous guerrilla fighter as governor of Panay and Romblon in the darkest hours of the occupation;
-Governor Confesor’s letter of reply for an offer of surrender to the Japanese Imperial Army was a classic defiance of the might of the enemy, and a great display of valor that reverberated in the Halls of the U.S. Congress;
-in the revolution against Spain in 1896, the patriotic fervor of the Ilonggos was never wanting as it was tried and tested in the battlefields;
-the Ilonggo resistance was led by Gen. Martin Delgado of Sta. Barbara, Iloilo and ably assisted by Gen. Adriano Dayot Hernandez of Dingle, Iloilo and hosts of other generals and officers in command;

WORLD WAR

-in World War I, Sergeant Ramon Sobejano of New Lucena, Iloilo was a recipient of the most decorated soldier fighting in Europe;
-in World War II, Captain Jose Calugas of Leon, Iloilo received the most coveted and highest medal of honor in the U.S. Army, the Congressional Medal of Honor.
“As ideas make history,” sighed Dayot, “Iloilo had its height of intellectual activities; it was a beehive of several local and national daily newspapers that projected the burning issues of the day.”
Dayot said from the rank and file editors and writers, came the names of Flavio Zarragoza Cano, the “Ilonggo Cervantes” whom Senator Claro M. Recto had the profound admiration and respect.
He also cited Ezequil Villalobos of Manila Bulletin; Rex Drilon, a political scientist and writer and the first Filipino president of the Central Philippine University (CPU); Stevan Javellana, whose book, “Without Seeing the Dawn,” was translated to several languages. It’s about a story of the Japanese Occupation in the country.
“The Ilonggos today, wherever we are, can look back with great pride of our legacy of greatness,” concluded Dayot.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

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Posted by on May 30, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

Atty. Dayot ‘wasn’t scared’ of death

“God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him.” 

— FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

ONE of the most important messages the late lawyer-philosopher Ernesto “Ernie” Dayot, 86, had reiterated after his wife died in 2013 was, “death doesn’t scare me, at all!”
“When we have accepted that there is a higher God, nothing can scare us–not even death; we will soon realize nothing is permanent here on earth,” Dayot waxed poetic during our luncheon philosophical binge that year when I was in the Philippines.
He, too, believed that what makes us all human is not entirely our intellect or our brain.
Although he was an avid objectivist, he agreed that there are things that have no relation with the physical brain or man’s intelligence.
They are an expression of the spirit inside us, he explained.
Dayot believed that humanity lies in our power to experience many different facets of life, for example our sense of justice, our ability to love, our ability to understand free will and the responsibility that comes with it, to appreciate beauty, and to develop art and culture.
If we are convinced we will live beyond death, we will be much more aware of the responsibility that we bear both for ourselves and towards others within creation, Dayot whose body was cremated on May 22, 2019 and was brought to his hometown in Dingle, Iloilo.

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We understand that our present life and the way we live it is closely connected with our continued existence after passing over, then we will have reason to fear the consequences of every single wrong and harmful deed we had committed.
We are still likely to suffer the consequences even if we no longer live on earth.
What Friedrich Nietzsche meant when he wrote that “God is dead” was not literally the physical death of God, Dayot reiterated.
Shakespeare did not say “To be, or not to be.” He wrote it, but Hamlet says it. Neither did Nietzsche say “God is dead”; a “madman” does. While it is true that Nietzsche himself went mad at 45, there is still a difference between life and literature, even when the latter is called philosophy, according to biographer Mike Macrone.
Not that there are “unbelievers” in the world, for that was always true; nor simply that God does not exist. For is “God is dead,” then He must have once been alive; but this is paradoxical, since if God were ever alive, He, being eternal, could never die.
The madman speaks not of the believer’s God, who always was and always will be, but rather of what God represented and meant to his culture.This God was a “shared belief” in God, and it is such belief that was expiring in 19th century Europe.

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“Where once God stood–at the center of knowledge and meaning–there is now a void. Science and philosophy alike treat God as irrelevant, and once again man has become the measure of all things,”according to Macrone.
Westerners have “killed” the God of their ancestors in turning over more toward nature and away from the supernatural. The believers in Nietzsche’s tale think seeking God is rather funny; only the madman realizes the terrible gravity of God’s death.
“Not that he laments it; in fact, he calls it a ‘great deed,’ but a deed likely too great for us, the murderers, to bear,” added Macrone.
A religion such as Christianity, despite the teachings of Jesus, perpetuates intolerance and conformity, which Nietzsche found especially repugnant. Whatever is old, habitual, normative, or dogmatic, he thought, is contrary to life and to dignity; it manifests what he called a “slave mentality.” In a sense, for a man and a woman to live, he or she must “kill” God–must overcome dogma, conformity, superstition, and fear.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

 
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Posted by on May 29, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

Money talks

“The greatest legacy one can pass on to one’s children and grandchildren is not money or other material things accumulated in one’s life, but rather a legacy of character and faith.”

–Billy Graham

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

NEW YORK CITY — WE learned an eye-popping lesson in the recent midterm elections that money really talked–and had “spoken” heavily.
Many competent and really deserving aspirants for a public office fell by the wayside or were badly clobbered by second-rate and amateurish rivals who brandished cash left and right like they won as grand champions in a multi-million cock derby.
Some of these lousy but moneyed candidates also got more attention from the press, while their more deserving rivals had to forage for recognition in order to be given a gargantuan space in the media.
Most of these good-for-nothing candidates also were recipients of fantabulous praises from paid media advertisements, newspaper columns, and blocktime radio programs.
Their poor rivals got nothing except being mentioned only in the news, yes, for being candidates in the elections. No mention of how good or great they are in certain fields, or how effective they would be if elected.

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Qualifications had no match against the full force of money.
Doctorate degrees were waylaid by inferior and unremarkable reputations.

Even ex-convicts, ruffians, rapists, grafters, magicians, circus players awash with cash steamrolled those with outstanding and distinctive reputations in community but didn’t have enough moolah to match their rivals’ ferocious expenditures.
The power of money and how to make the impossible become possible; how to turn black into white vice versa; how to make people turn deaf, mute, and blind, is awesome.
No one should underestimate the capacity of money to turn a normal situation upside down; to buy loyalties; to create and propagate a bundle of lies; as payoff to mercinaries and hooligans; to sponsor a mayhem; as a bribe; to harass; to kill; and, yes, to buy votes.

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We made a great deal of research on when did money start making the world go round.
In 101 Things You Need To Know…And Some You Don’t Know, Richard Horne and Tracy Turner give an explanation:
“Say you had twelve goats and needed a sack of grain and a pair of shoes. Before money was invented, you might offer one of your goats to a local farmer in exchange for the grain, and another goat to a cobbler in return for shoes. Hang on! A whole goat seems a lot for a pair of shoes. Oh, and the cobbler doesn’t need any goats. The farmer’s up for the deal if you can give him a cow. So you then have to find someone with a spare cow who wants goats? And how many coats make a camel!?”
Using money is a lot less complicated than this tricky bartering system, they explain.
No one knows who exactly came up with the idea, but they reportedly lived in China.
–It’s thought that cowry shells were used as the first ever money in China around 1200 BC. The first metal money appeared there 200 years later.
–Native American Indians also used shells as money. This is first recorded in the 16th century, but they were probably used long before that.
–The first coins were made out of silver. Unlike today’s coins, which are symbols of value, these silver coins were valuable in themselves because they were made from a precious metal.
–To avoid carting around heavy coins, the Chinese introduced paper money and used it from about the 9th to the 15th century (when they stopped the practice because of high inflation). Elsewhere in the world paper money wasn’t used for centuries.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

 
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Posted by on May 28, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

Ganzon, Treñas, Baronda: clans to watch in next 10 years

“In our age there is no such thing as ‘keeping out of politics.’ All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, evasions, folly, hatred and schizophrenia.” 

–George Orwell

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

BASED on the recent election results in Iloilo City, three political clans have clinched major portfolios in the city government; and their sensational victories have given the Ilonggos the bird’s eye view on which family will dominate Iloilo City’s politics in the next 10 years.
They are: the Ganzons, the Treñases, and the Barondas.
The descendants of the late former Senator Rodolfo “Roding” Ganzon became the head turners since the wheels of fortune appear to be tilting on their side.
Aside from Vice Mayor Jeffrey Ganzon (119, 123 votes), who cemented his hold in the city’s second highest post with an overwhelming victory over Councilors Plaridel Nava (61,973 votes) and R Leonie Gerochi (22,774 votes), the late senator’s grandson and the vice mayor’s son, Rudolf, garnered 102,201 votes to land third in the 12-seat city council.

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Another Ganzon scion, Gerald, Rudolf’s younger brother, is expected to join the bandwagon and run in the 2022 elections.
If Gerald wins, there will be three elected Ganzon formidable warm bodies to serve in the city government.
Treñas doesn’t have children now actively participating in the city politics. He is currently being buttressed by his nephew, Councilor Jay, who collected 99,656 votes for fourth place.
The Ganzons’ real threats for supremacy in the next 10 to 20 years come from the Baronda sisters: Congresswoman-elect Julienne “Jam-Jam” (115,148 votes) and No.1 reelected Councilor Love-Love (131,226 votes).
The first woman representative in Iloilo City, young and energetic at 40, can still run for another term and may become the next city mayor after graduating from the House of Representatives.
Love-Love, the No. 1 city councilor, can be a future candidate for vice mayor and higher.

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We foresee a fierce political rivalry between the Ganzons and the Barondas in the near future.
The feisty Gonzalez family was supposed to be the one dominating Iloilo City’s political landscape, but after the death of former congressman and justice secretary Raul M. Gonzalez on September 7, 2014, nobody from the talent-laden family was able to duplicate the late old man’s political genius and supremacy.
Gonzalez’s son Raul Jr., daughter Dr. Gold, and wife Dr. Pacita, suffered heart-rending setbacks one after another in the local elections.
Dr. Pacita’s latest defeat for city mayor to Treñas has virtually made their gallant stand to revive the patriarch’s past political glory almost improbable.

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Former city councilor and National Youth Commission (NYC) executive director, Dr. Nielex “Lex” Tupas is currently “out of kulambo” after opting not to run against Baronda in the recent congressional elections, but their family is being carried by Dra. Candice, who landed fifth in the race for city council with 98,457 votes.
The Tupases, a maverick political clan in Iloilo Province, also would’ve been in a strong contention for political dominance in the city in the next 10 to 20 years like the Barondas and the Ganzons, but Dr. Lex Tupas chose to “preserve” his good relationship with the Barondas in exchange for what could have been another political conquest in the recent May 13, 2019 midterm polls.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

 
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Posted by on May 28, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

No Iloilo Dinagyang delegation in 2019 New York parade

“If you’re not in the parade, you watch the parade. That’s life.”

–Mike Ditka

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

The 21st Philippine Independence Commemoration Parade (29th Annual Parade, New York City) on June 2, 2019 will miss the presence of the delegations from the Dinagyang Festival and the Iloilo Trade Mission.
The Philippine Independence Day Council, Inc. (PIDCI), the parade organizer in cooperation with the Philippine Consulate General in New York, has not confirmed the participation of the Ilonggo groups this year.
Both the Dinagyang Festival of Iloilo City and the Manggahan Festival of Guimaras Province and city officials from the first-ever private-initiated Iloilo City Trade Mission and Investment Forum Ilonggo Fashion and Jewelry Show in the East Coast held on June 4-10, 2018, took part in the biggest parade for the Philippine Independence Day in the East Coast on June 3, 2018.
Mayor Jose “Joe III” Espinosa, who spearheaded the Iloilo Trade Mission, was joined last year by his wife, Gina Sarabia-Espinosa.
Iloilo Dinagyang Foundation boss Ramon Cua Locsin led the Dinagyang Festival delegation.

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The team, led by Dr. Emily Noserale Hagad, president and project coordinator of Philcoman Research Institute, Inc. in the private sector, was composed of Councilor Plaridel Nava, Commercial Diplomat for Trade Relations of the City Rex Aguado, City Local Economic Enterprise Officer Jose Ariel Castañeda, City Planning Coordinator Jose Roni Peñalosa, Western Visayas State University College of Communication Dean, Dr. Carmencita “Menchie” Robles, University of the Philippines in the Visayas (UPV) Vice Chancellor Mary Ann Gumban, Iloilo Business Park-Megaworld Sales Director Carla Margarita Perez, Eon Group of Companies founder and CEO Felicito Tiu, StackTreck Enterprises CEO Billy Shung Hei Yuen, City Mayor’s Office staff Rosita Celiz, and journalists Florence Hibionada (Secretariat Chief), Tara Yap (Manila Bulletin) and Herbert Vego (Panay News), who also did Herculean efforts to promote Iloilo City as an ideal and perfect hub for business, tourism, education and investment.

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Alma May Tayo, chair of the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCCI) Iloilo Chapter Exhibitors’ Committee, also actively joined the trade mission in New York, Virginia and Washington D.C. and the New York City Independence Day parade.
City Tourism Operations Officer Florence King Haro Erlano and Iloilo City Tourism and Development Office staff Sheena Julienne Galon did amazing reinforcement tasks during the parade and the trade mission and investment forum.
Executive Assistant Jojo Castro, “Iloilo City’s Bong Go”, was with City Engineer Bobby Divinagracia, and Iloilo City National High School principal and Tribu Panayanon tribe manager, Dr. Blesilda V. Floro.
It was not immediately known if Mayor Joe III’s defeat to Rep. Geronimo “Jerry” Trenas in the May 13, 2019 elections had affected the reported plans earlier to duplicate the Iloilo Trade Mission, which became the talk of the town among members of the Filipino community in the East Coast when it was held for the first time last year.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

 
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Posted by on May 27, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

Bacolod set to upstage Iloilo as WV’s ‘mall capital’

“Doing a mall is not only construction of the physical place: what is important is the merchandising mix. We strive to serve the convenience of the public. We want shopping at our malls to be a unique and an enjoyable experience.”

–Henry Sy

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

NEW YORK CITY –WHEN the SM City Prime Holdings, owned by the late Henry Sy Sr., opened its 8th SM
Supermall in Iloilo City on June 11, 1999, Iloilo City earned the reputation as the “Mall Capital of Western Visayas”.
No present-day mall in Western Visayas has eclipsed SM City Iloilo’s vast size, a four-level complex composed of lower ground floor, upper ground floor, second floor with a total retail floor area of 181,657 sq.m. located at Mandurriao district.
Even if all the malls in Iloilo, Bacolod, Roxas City, San Jose de Buenavista, Kalibo would be joined under one roof, none could match SM City Iloilo’s imposing physical structure that features eight cinemas, food hall, food court and a cyberzone; the SM Foodcourt on the Lower Ground Level of the Main Building, SM Cyberzone at the Third Level of the Northpoint, SM Foodhall at the 2nd Floor of the Northpoint.
Only SM City Bacolod (divided into two buildings called the “North Wing” and the “South Wing” connected by two bridge ways that allow patrons to walk between the two structures), which opened on March 1, 2007, could come near SM City Iloilo’s magnificence in size and value.

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Robinsons Mall also sprouted in Western Visayas’ two major cities, but Iloilo City still retained the kingship in as far as the title of “Mall Capital” in the region is concerned.
But this title may soon be taken away by Bacolod City.
Arra B. Francia reported in the BusinessWorld that Megaworld Corp. is investing P1.2 billion to develop a three-storey mall inside its 34-hectare Upper East township in Bacolod City.
Quoting a statement Megaworld Corp issued on May 24, 2019, the report said the Upper East Mall will cover 24,200 square meters in gross floor area and will have restaurants, four cinemas, an open-air food hall, and an indoor garden.
The Upper East Mall will also reportedly feature a 48-meter clock tower, seen to serve as a landmark for the township’s six-lane main avenue spanning from Lopez Jaena Street to Circumferential Road.
Megaworld Chief Strategy Officer Kevin Andrew L. Tan said in a statement: “We are curating an architectural masterpiece that depicts the cosmopolitan vibe of our Bacolod township. This is just the first mall that we are building in this township because there is still more room for future expansion.”
Megaworld will reportedly use a solar panel roofing for the mall, as well as other energy efficiency features including perceived airconditioning cooling design, escalators with crawling features, rainwater harvesting system that will use the collected water for plants, and gray water recycling system.
Francia reported further that “a gray water recycling system means that water discharged from the sewage treatment plant will be used for secondary flushing of the mall’s toilets and urinals.”
Megaworld expects to complete the mall by 2021.

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Francia reported that “it will be then be directly connected to the transport hub that the company is building across the township’s central park, which in turn faces two residential towers called One Regis and Two Regis.”
Upper East Mall forms part of the company’s P28-billion investment to develop the Upper East in a span of 10 years.
“In the next three to five years, we will see the residential towers, office towers, commercial buildings, hotel, church, parks, and this new lifestyle mall rising. We will also be opening the Upper East Avenue to the public in two years,” Mr. Tan said.
Aside from the Upper East, Megaworld is also developing a 54-hectare township called Northill Gateway along the Bacolod-Silay Airport Access Road. The estate will have its own lifestyle mall and residential villages–Forbes Hill and Fountain Grove.
Megaworld’s net income attributable to the parent grew by 16% to P3.8 billion in the first quarter of 2019, after consolidated revenues surged 15% to P14.9 billion.
The BusinessWorld report also said shares in Megaworld dropped 0.91% or five centavos to close at P5.44 each at the stock exchange on Friday.
The beauty of modern capitalism is it brings unlimited economic progress to cities.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

 
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Posted by on May 26, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

How I remember ‘Bombo Armand Parcon’

“Don’t be dismayed by good-byes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends.” 

–Richard Bach

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

NEW YORK CITY — ILOILO City Councilor Armand Parcon was my first buddy from the broadcast media along with Francis Hinayhinay (Pare Armand’s colleague in the defunct dyRP Radyo Tagring), when I started writing for the fledgling New Express in 1988.
When they left dyRP, they became “Bombo Armand” and “Bombo Francis.”
When I was assigned in the Capitol beat during the administration of Iloilo Governor Simplicio “Sim” Grino from 1989 to 1991, fellow Capitol beat reporter Bombo Armand and I were almost inseparable, while Bombo Francis “retired” and dabbled into buy-and-sell business.
In 1991, Bombo Armand and I contemplated on changing our profession. We both took an examination for employment in foreign service supervised by the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), which was planning to open a regional office in Iloilo. We both didn’t make it.

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Back in our Capitol beat, in most of our out-of-town sojourns to gather reports, another former dyRP mainstay Arsenio “Kamlon” Ang, who was then reporting for the now defunct dyXX, joined us regularly.
Soon our number (the working press) in the Capitol beat grew. There were Jojie Tiongco and Nereo Lujan of Panay News, Gemma Villanueva and the late Erla Ojana of IBC-12, Fernando “Nanding” Madero of dyRI Radyo Agong, the late Tony Laniog and Ibrahim Calanao of dyBQ Radyo Budyong, the late Rene Porras of dyRP, Romela Arieta-Sanggalan and the late Joe Sepulvida of Radyo Ng Bayan, Romy Belisario of dyXX.
When we weren’t gathering reports, Bombo Armand, businessman Francis, and I were at the batchoyan kiosk of manang Marlyn inside the Iloilo Central Market and at the Sariling Sikap restaurant on J.M Basa Street, City Proper.

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When I was assigned in the City Hall beat after the 1992 elections, it was Bombo Armand’s turn to be assigned in the same beat replacing Bombo Abe Beatingo during the administration of Mayor Mansueto “Mansing” Malabor.
Together with Lemuel Fernandez (Panay News) Wenceslao Mateo (Panay News), Gemma Villanueva and Stanley Palisda (ABS-CBN), Lynon Cortez (dyOK), Art Calsas (dyBQ Radyo Budyong), Joy de Leon (News Express), Jun Lojero, Fernando “Kapid” Gabio, Roger Tamon, and Jun Intrepido (dyRI Radyo Tagring), we organized the Iloilo City Hall Press Corps.
When it was my time to become president in 1998, Bombo Armand was our treasurer.
He was aware that the Iloilo City Hall Press Corps under my presidency “owed” me P5,000, the amount I forked from my own pocket when we ran out of funds during our induction ceremony held at restaurant in front of the Iloilo Hall of Justice.
We didn’t have enough funds because I was the only president who didn’t allow our members to solicit for our induction ceremony.
In his last message to me on Facebook, Bombo Armand said he was looking forward to join me and Francis Hinayhinay when I go back there in our former favorite “watering hole” in the eary 90’s: in the batchoysan inside the Iloilo Central Market where we regularly discussed so many things about life and our profession and where we solidified our friendship.
Councilor “Bombo Armand” Parcon, my kumpare and buddy during his glory days in the broadcast media, left us on Thursday night after more than a week of confinement at the West Visayas State University Medical Center, according to my kumare Veronica.
He reportedly succumbed to pneumonia complications.
Rest in peace, Pare Armand.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

 
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Posted by on May 24, 2019 in Uncategorized