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Daily Archives: July 10, 2019

Bus venture’s snafu is everybody’s business

“Since most corporate competitors have the same problems with sustainability and social reputation, it’s worth trying to solve them together.”

–Simon Mainwaring

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

WE don’t agree that the corporate feud among the siblings that operate the Philippines’ biggest bus venture “is none of the people’s business.”
It may be true in as far as the corporate territory is concerned, but not in as far as public interest is concerned.
The Yanson family-controlled Vallacar Transit Inc. (VTI), Bachelor Express Inc., Rural Transit Mindanao Inc., Sugbo Transit Express Inc. and Mindanao Star Business Transit Inc. may be a private enterprise, but their clients, the customers are the riding public.
The nature of the transportation business can not detach the company from its inherent social responsibility and accountability.
Since the aforementioned bus companies operate through a franchise issued by the government to serve the public commuters, public interest is very much involved, vital and necessary.
So much so that if the bus operations will be hampered and cause prejudice to the riding public as a result of any mismanagement or internal wrangling in the venture, the government is empowered by law to take over the company’s operations.

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Thus the people have the right to know what’s going on and how are the corporate board and officers handle and resolve the snafu.
Lawyer Sheila Sison, who represents Roy Yanson’s group (that wrested control of the company from Roy’s younger brother Leo Rey after a boardroom mutiny on July 7, 2019), meanwhile, has assured the public: “Despite this revamp, the board assures the public, its employees, and all its stakeholders that the company remains committed to serve the riding public. Company policies and programs will remain the same, and its transport services will continue to be fully operational.”
Leo Rey, on the other hand, has “condemned the act of the de facto President, Roy Yanson in bringing in armed men inside company premises, sowing unnecessary fear amongst the employees. The act of the de facto President will surely hamper the operations of the company and spread confusion among the employee.”
Based on these contrasting pronouncements, the tumult may still be far from over.
In the name of public interest, we shall continue to monitor whether the contending parties can hack out a win-win solution or one party will decide to throw the white flag in favor of the other party.

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According to spiritual book author Max Lucado, worry happens when we keep our problems to ourselves or present our problems to the puny deities of money, muscle, or humankind.
“The act of prayers moves us from a spirit of concern to a spirit of gratitude,” he explains. “Even before our prayers are answered, our hearts begin to change.”
Lucado suggests that we take these steps:
-take your worries to God;
-find a promise to much your problem; and
-pray specifically.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

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Posted by on July 10, 2019 in Uncategorized

 

Admin cases? Shrug them off

“Life is about having a good time, and it was a good time. We did some things well and some things poorly, but that was always the case.” 

–Norman Lear

By Alex P. Vidal60336807_10214018136070347_8150589498095304704_n

PARENTS of children who live in the cities and provinces in Western Visayas with high percentage of dengue fever cases, based on the statistics of the Department of Health (DoH), are still restless and getting paranoid.
They fear that even a simple insect bite on their kids’ skin will land them in the hospital.
Most of these worried parents, who can hardly make both ends meet, think they will face a terrible financial meltdown once their kids undergo medical proceedings for a mere insect bite.
Even if a red mark on their children’s skin was caused only by a bite of an ant or any insect that doesn’t carry a life-threatening virus, the parents panicked and feared for the worst.
This explains why government district hospitals in Iloilo have been inundated with patients mostly children with high fever and other signs of dengue infection.
Unless the dengue scare has been nipped in the bud, hospitals would continue to swell; this would justify the declaration of the state of calamity by the local governments.

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Much has been written on how to prevent or fight dengue fever, but the ones suggested by Dr. Janice Litza, a Board Certified Family Medicine Physician based in Wisconsin, on May 12, 2019, are probably the most practical and logical. Dr. Litza suggested the following:
1. Stay indoors or under a mosquito net during peak mosquito times. The dengue mosquito has two peak periods of biting activity: in the morning for several hours after daybreak and in the late afternoon for several hours before dark. Nevertheless, the mosquito may feed at any time during the day, especially indoors, in shady areas, or when it is overcast.
2. Use insect repellent when outdoors. It is important to protect yourself from mosquito bites when you will be spending time outdoors in mosquito infested areas. Apply insect repellent to all exposed areas of your skin before heading outside
3. Cover your skin. You can reduce your chances of being bitten if you cover up as much of your skin as possible. Wear loose, long-sleeved shirts, socks, and long pants when you will be traveling to mosquito infested areas
4. Get rid of standing water in your area. Mosquitoes breed in standing water. Mosquito breeding sites include artificial water containers such as discarded tires, uncovered water storage barrels, buckets, flower vases or pots, cans, and cisterns. Help to reduce the mosquito population in your area by getting rid of any standing water that has collected around your house or campsite

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ALLIES of Mayor Geronimo “Jerry” Treñas in the Iloilo City Council should not worry about the administrative cases for dereliction of duty as public officials filed against them by their former colleagues, lawyers Joshua Alim and Plaridel Nava.
Better still, they shouldn’t overreact.
In fact, they should expect more cases in the future (if they misbehave) now that the two firebrands are “outside thekulambo,” so to speak.
Administrative cases are normal for government officials. The least they can get if found guilty is a rap in the knuckles.
No one will go to jail. No one will lose a “lucrative” committee chairmanship. No one will be subjected to humiliation like in a criminal case where an accused public official can lose both his reputation and position if convicted for stealing the people’s money.
Cases like the ones these Treñas allies are facing is an indication that democracy is alive and kicking in Iloilo City.
(The author, who is now based in New York City, used to be the editor of two local dailies in Iloilo)

 
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Posted by on July 10, 2019 in Uncategorized