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Category Archives: HEALTH

Be kind to a kind husband

“A real man loves his wife, and places his family as the most important thing in life. Nothing has brought me more peace and content in life than simply being a good husband and father.”
— Frank Abagnale

By Alex P. Vidal

NEW YORK CITY –– I thought it’s happening only in the movies.
Or in squatter colonies of Third World countries.
To my horror and shock, it happened right here in the freest and safest country in the world.
Miratsu is a brutal wife.
She physically assaulted Samoht in public–in front of Samoht’s friends and admirers in a Queens public park.
Miratsu used her physical advantage as a light-heavyweight bully to inflict harm on lightweight Samoht.
Based on my personal knowledge and on eyewitnesses’ account, Miratsu mauled her husband four times in as many surprised “attacks” in the same park.

CHESS

One time at around 7:45 o’clock in the morning while Samoht and I were playing chess in the park, Miratsu arrived unannounced and unnoticed.
Like a drooling mad dog, she came not only to beat up Samoht anew, but also to verbally abuse him.
Samoht only noticed the presence of the lady version of Mike Tyson when she was already a spit away from him.
Miratsu quickly performed sadistic rituals, rolling over the unprepared and terrified Samoht like a Samoan wrestler and whacked both his ears with ala Fernando Poe Jr. combination.
Early morning joggers, park habitues, some of Samoht’s friends saw cruelty unfold but couldn’t stop the beast thinking it’s only the spill over of a domestic rift.
The Punch and Judy Show scene occurred two more times in another time and day on the same spot.
1. Why was Miratsu so cruel? Miratsu was mad at Samoht for repeated curfew violations. Samoht had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and was under strict medication.
He wasn’t supposed to stay longer outdoor playing chess in the park. He was supposed to quit smoking, too.

OVERNIGHT

Samoht did not only extend his exposure outside their house, he also spent overnight in the park playing chess. And he smoked non-stop like a chimney.
But, did his “sins” justify the mauling in public? Did it merit a public scandal?
2. Why did Samoht allow or tolerate Miratsu’s violence? Because Samoht was a good husband; a martyr. He was  soft-spoken and a peace advocate, a church deacon, a non-violent and very humble person who didn’t say bad words; a true friend rolled into one.
When he passed away on December 15, Miratsu regretted what she did to Samoht. She lost a good partner in life. And she had no more punching bag.
“At 61, he was not supposed to die early. Because he was a good person and a peaceful man, he was supposed to live longer, right?” Miratsu told me in a funeral home on Sunday night (December 16, 2017).

 

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Posted by on December 31, 2017 in Family, HEALTH, PSYCHOLOGY

 

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Why husband Richard is silent

“A good wife always forgives her husband when she’s wrong.”
— Milton Berle

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By Alex P. Vidal

NEW YORK CITY –– Before the start of any formal investigation in congress on the Dengvaxia tragedy, the name of Dr. Janette Loreto-Garin is already in tatters.
Angry parents, politicians, health workers, opinion writers tore to shreds the former Philippines Department of Health (DOH) secretary and blamed her for the titanic vaccination disaster that reportedly put at risk thousands of lives of Filipino schoolchildren.
If she were Japanese, Loreto-Garin, 45, would have committed suicide due to large-scale damage on her name and intensity of condemnation from irate public.
But Loreto-Garin isn’t yet finished.
She didn’t fly the coop.
She failed to immediately address the issue because she was mourning the recent death of her father, Jose, in Baybay, Leyte.
She has expressed willingness to face any investigation in proper forum and in proper time.

-o0o-

We expect Iloilo 1st district Rep. Oscar “Richard” Garin Jr., husband of Dr. Loreto-Garin, to defend his wife amid the worsening storm of public denunciation.
Rep. Garin, himself probably shocked by the wave of public outcry for his wife’s blood, hasn’t issued any public statement in defense of his physician wife.
But in his Facebook account, Rep. Garin posted on December 10, 2017 a NEWS ABS-CBN.COM article entitled: “Garin tags ex-health chief Ona in dengue vaccine decision.”
Earlier on December 8, 2017, Rep. Garin also posted a NEWSINFO INQUIRER.NET opinion article entitled: “In defense of Garin” written by Ramon Tulfo.
No husband will sit down and keep quite while his wife is being sliced to pieces by vitriol and vilification coming from all angles.
No husband will not feel sad after seeing on national TV and reading in the newspapers and the social media bundles of unsavory words being thrown at his wife.
But unlike other husbands or wives of embattled public officials who immediately join the fray and lash at critics of their loved ones when push comes to shove, Rep. Garin did not want to throw caution to the wind and will probably wait for the right time to open his mouth.

-o0o-
Owners of restaurants and pubs selling liquors in Iloilo City in the Philippines are aghast by the city dads’ proposal to limit the serving or selling of alcoholic drinks at 1 o’clock in the morning.
They fear loss of income.
Many of these establishments operate only at night and cater to drinking customers and tourists who come home late or at around 3 to 4 o’clock in the morning.
The proposal came after a shooting incident killed a promising medical worker at Smallville two weeks ago.
Probers attributed the violence to a dispute between two groups of young men intoxicated by liquor.
They theorized that if they were not drunk, the protagonists wouldn’t have resorted to violence and a life would’ve been spared.
But what about illegal drugs? Where authorities able to determine with finality that liquor had caused the fracas?
But in any decision that redounds to the benefit of society, the public officials have the final say after a public hearing has been conducted.

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2017 in HEALTH, NEWS!!!NEWS!!!NEWS!!!

 

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George didn’t wake us up before he ‘go-go’

“I’m never gonna dance again guilty feet have got no rhythm though it’s easy to pretend I know your not a fool.”WHAM! in “Careless Whisper.”

By Alex P. Vidal

NEW JERSEY — In the past Christmases, George Michael (born Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou) “gave us his heart.”
We didn’t give it away.
But last Christmas 2016, the reclusive British pop icon who once pricked his fans to “wake him up before you go-go”, decided to “go-go” for good without waking us up.
He bade farewell on Christmas Day, December 25.
And the world of pop music wasn’t saved from tears.
At 53, the Charismatic composer-singer, who serenaded the world as member of the dynamic duo Wham! with the spine-tingling “Careless Whisper” in 1984, succumbed to heart attack in Goring-on-Thames, United Kingdom, doctors said.
In our high school days, Wham! blossomed into a full-scale phenomenon with their 1983 debut album Fantastic, which charged to the top of the charts.
That’s my first date with Wham! However, when I first saw Wham’s! frame, I thought it was Andrew Ridgeley, George Michael’s best friend and partner, who was the lead vocalist.
At that time, another George–Boy George of the Culture Club–was giving Michael and Wham! a run for their money in Great Britain’s new pop boom.

ALBUM

According to the British newspaper, theguardian, Wham’s! second album, Make It Big (1984), turned them into a global success story, spinning off singles such as Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go, Careless Whisper, Freedom and Everything She Wants.
In 1985, Wham! achieved a massive publicity coup by becoming the first western pop group to visit the People’s Republic of China. The visit was filmed by the director Lindsay Anderson as Foreign Skies: Wham! In China (1986).
Like in the cases of other pop stars who died at the height of their popularity, George Michael’s death was also shrouded with controversy.
There were reports that several weeks before his death, George, who had open relationships with males, became reclusive and refused to display himself in public “because he did not like his new looks.”
Michael was also reportedly engaged in drug offense and was arrested and fined in 2010 drugs offences after admitting driving under the influence of drugs, having crashed his Range Rover into a Snappy Snaps photo store in Hampstead.

OBITUARY

His obituary stated that “in June 2012 Michael released the single White Light to mark the 30th anniversary of Wham Rap!. In March 2014 he released Symphonica, which became his seventh solo album to top the UK chart. This month, it was announced that he was working on a new album with producer and songwriter Naughty Boy. Also in the pipeline was a film, provisionally titled Freedom: George Michael, due to accompany the reissue of his 1990 album Listen Without Prejudice Vol 1. With Michael as narrator, the film would feature stars including Stevie Wonder, Elton John, Liam Gallagher and Mary J Blige as well as the supermodels who had appeared in his Freedom! ’90 video.”
The obituary added: “His mother, Lesley, died in 1997. He is survived by his father and his two sisters, Melanie and Yioda. George Michael (Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou), singer and songwriter, born 25 June 1963; died 25 December 2016.”

 

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What day did you sneeze?

“Do you know how helpless you feel if you have a full cup of coffee in your hand and you start to sneeze?” — JEAN KERR

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By Alex P. Vidal

NEW YORK CITY — While standing in a long line at the Bank of America ATM machine in Jackson Heights, Queens on Thursday morning (a Thanksgiving day, November 24, in the United States), I sneezed twice.
An elderly Latina woman in front of me turned her back and sighed, “God bless you.”
“Thank you,” I replied.
“Today is what day, honey?” she snapped back with a smile. “Ah Thursday. Something better will happen to you because you sneezed on Thursday. If it’s Friday, you sneeze for sorrow.”
She continued: If I sneeze on Wednesday, I will receive a letter. On Tuesday, I kiss a stranger. On Monday, I sneeze for danger. On Saturday, I see my lover tomorrow. On Sunday, the devil will have me for the rest of the week. Oh lala.
She was being superstitious. I don’t believe in superstition but I thanked her nevertheless.

PUBLIC

In the bus, train, shopping centers, coffee shops, among other public places, I sneezed in the past and people were apt to say, “God bless you” or the German expression, “Gesundheit,” or the Italian word, “Felicita.”
In the old practice, they would clasp their hands and bow toward the one who sneezed, which is popular in Near and Far East until today.
The custom of asking God’s blessing started when early man believed that the essence of life–the spirit or soul–was in the form of air and breath and resided in one’s head, according to authors Claudia De Lys and Julie Forsyth Bachelor.
A sneeze might accidentally expel the spirit for a short time or even forever, unless God prevented it.
The act of bowing toward the sneezer was also reportedly counter-magic. For it meant, “May your soul not escape.”

SPIRITS

There were some ancients who believed that evil spirits which had previously entered the body jumped out when one sneezed. This meant danger to others for such spirits might now enter their bodies.
So the expression or blessing was to protect others as well as the one who sneezed. So serious was a sneezed considered in the Middle Ages that even today people speak of certain situations as “not to be sneezed at.”
We know today that a sneeze is one of our unconscious reflexes. However, medical men consider it almost as harmful to others as some of the primitive people did, explained Lys and Bachelor.
For, instead of “evil spirits,” sneezing expels harmful bacteria and is one of the most effective ways of spreading disease. So our best counter-charm, say the doctors, is to cover a sneeze with a handkerchief so our germs won’t jump down someone else’s throat.

 
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Posted by on November 27, 2016 in HEALTH, HISTORY, SCIENCE

 

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What’s your taste?

“All of life is a dispute over taste and tasting.” — FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

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By Alex P. Vidal

NEW YORK CITY — What is bad taste? How do we differentiate it from good taste? Who determines whether my taste, your taste, their taste is better?
That people differ in their tastes is itself an indisputable fact. It is also true that there is no point in arguing with a man about what he likes or dislikes.
But it is still quite possible to tell a man that he has poor taste and that what he likes is in itself not excellent or beautiful. Here there is plenty of room for argument.
Those who say there is no disputing about tastes usually mean more than they say. In our judgment they are wrong not in what they say but in what they mean. They start from the fact that people differ in taste, in what they like and dislike, and conclude that that is all there is to it.
They conclude, in other words, that in talking about works of art of things of beauty, the only opinions which people can express must take the familiar form of “I don’t know whether it’s beautiful or not, but I know what I like.”

SUBJECTIVE

This conclusion makes beauty entirely subjective or, as the saying goes, entirely a matter of individual taste. People sometimes take the same position about truth and goodness. The truth, they say, is merely what seems true to me. The good is merely what I regard as desirable. They thus reduce truth and goodness to matters of taste about which there can be no argument.
Let us illustrate the mistake they make. If a man says to us, “That object looks red to me,” we would be foolish to argue with him about how it looks. The fact that it looks gray to us has no bearing on how it looks to him.
Nevertheless, we may be able to show him that he is deceived by the reddish glow from a light shining on the object and that, in fact, the object is gray, not red. Even after we have proved this to him by physical tests, the object may still look red to him, but he will be able to recognize the difference between the appearance and the reality.

ILLUSTRATION

This simple illustration shows that while there is no point in arguing about how things look, there is good reason to argue about what things are.
Similarly, if a person insists upon telling us what he likes or dislikes in works of art, he is expressing purely subjective opinions which cannot be disputed. But good critics try to express objective judgments about the excellence or defects of a work itself. They are talking about the object, not about themselves.
Most of us know the difference between good and bad workmanship. If we hire a carpenter to make a table for us and he does a bad job, we point out to him that the table is unsteady or that its legs are too light for the weight of the top. What is true of carpentry is true of all the other arts. Like tables, works of fine art can be well made or poorly made. Well-made things have certain objective qualities which can be recognized by those who know what is involved in good or bad workmanship in the particular field of art.
To recognize excellence in a piece of music, one must have some knowledge of the art of composing music. If a man lacks such knowledge, of course, all he can say is that he likes or dislikes the music. The man who insists that that is all he or anyone else can say is simply confessing his own ignorance about music. He can go expressing his likes and dislikes in music, but he should not, in his ignorance, deny others the right to make objective judgments based on knowledge he does not have.

QUESTION

The question to ask anyone who insists that the beauty in works of art is entirely a matter of personal taste is whether some people have better taste than others. Do some men have good taste and others quite bad taste? Is it possible for a person to improve his taste?
An affirmative answer to these questions amounts to an admission that there are objective standards for making critical judgments about works of art. Having good taste consists in preferring that which is objectively more excellent. Acquiring good taste in some field of art depends on acquiring knowledge about the art and learning to recognize excellence in workmanship.
If there were no objective differences which made works of art more or less beautiful, it would be impossible to say that anyone has good or bad taste or that it is worth making a great effort to improve one’s taste.

 
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Posted by on November 21, 2016 in HEALTH, PSYCHOLOGY

 

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Write like Lydia Pendon but don’t die like a pauper

“Don’t send me flowers when I’m dead. If you like me, send them while I’m alive.”

— Brian Clough

By Alex P. Vidal

NEW YORK CITY — If she were a college professor, students of Ms Lydia Pendon would have called her a “terror” or “Miss Tapia” (a tough contrabida teacher in a Tito, Vic & Joey comedy sitcom, “Iskul Bukol”).
If she were a parent, Ms Pendon would be the “stage mother” type: strictly no boyfriend or girlfriend for my son or daughter; no dating; no courtship.
If she were a wife, Ms. Pendon, a tall woman, would not hesitate to wring the neck of a philandering husband or send to the emergency room first a wife beater before he can clobber her.
She was ultraconservative and had no mercy for “mga ikratan” (flirt girls) and would side with the accused in rape cases. She hated political butterflies and admired a lot Iloilo City Mayor Jed Patrick Mabilog, the last person who gave her employment when income in the newspapers couldn’t anymore sustain her basic needs.

FEARED

Ms. Pendon, who did not teach in school, never had a child, and never married, was one of the most “feared” senior media practitioners in the Philippines. Feared both by her colleagues and corrupt public officials.
Colleagues got ribbed with a mouthful if their jokes could not pass her standard. She once devoted an entire column lashing at a city councilor for calling her “la on” (unmarried old lady) in a Christmas party hosted by Vice Mayor Vic Facultad.
She was also among the most popular. Former Senate President Nene Pimentel and former President Gloria Arroyo called her “Lydia”; former Senator Nikki Coseteng addressed her as “Manang Lydia”, among other national figures during press conferences.
In 1992, when she quit from Panay News to join us in the News Express, Ms. Pendon stirred the hornet’s nest when she convinced business manager Mariano Malones (now mayor of Maasin, Iloilo) to purge the paper with “reds” or “left-leaning writers like Pet and Alex.”
Pet Melliza, now a lawyer, was the editor, and Alex was yours truly, then staff member and sports writer.

SACK

Atty. Melliza forgave Ms. Pendon when she told colleagues about a joke that she once saw him “carrying a sack full of firearms and grenades” after a press conference in Hotel del Rio, but wanted “to teach her a lesson” for calling us “communists”; ergo we had no business staying in the paper.
To make the long story short, she was in, the “communists” were out.
The National Labor Relations Commission (NLRC) awarded us with damages. The “communists” were vindicated.
It was not until 2004 when Ms. Pendon and I were reunited again in one newspaper. Daily Informer publisher Bernie Miaque convinced me to take the portfolio as editor-in-chief, to work with my one-time “assassin” Ms. Pendon, who was the paper’s associate editor.
I had no problem working with Ms. Pendon, who was so tenacious and treated her job as her own baby.
It was in the Daily Informer where we strengthened our friendship and camaraderie until 2008 when the paper made its dramatic exit from the public.
Ms. Pendon, who started her career as photographer during the Marcos years, was a good writer. Her prose and style were so simple that even those who have not gone to school could appreciate her articles.
She died a pauper. She never had a car. She never owned a house and lot. When she decided to devote her life in mass media, it’s tantamount to making a vow of poverty.

GLAMOUR

Her life as a journalist was glamorous. Public officials, business leaders, and socialites admired and respected her as a person. Press releases sent to the editorial room carried notes like love letters to “Inday Lyds.”
She was a hero to her family. With her meager income as a newshen and, later on, as casual employee in city hall, Ms. Pendon helped sustain her family financially and otherwise–and probably forgot that she, too, had a life to live.
It was retired city hall public information officer Amante “Boy” Espejo who informed me that Ms. Pendon had collapsed in the city hall comfort room several days before she succumbed to brain aneurysm on Oct. 21, 2016 while confined at the St. Paul’s Hospital in Iloilo City. He also informed me that she was already 70. She should have retired a long time ago.
The younger generation in Iloilo media lost a “mother” in “Mommy Lyds”. We lost a media warrior, a fighter in the arena of public service and journalism. Rest in peace, Inday Lyds. Thank you for the friendship and for being an inspiration to us.

 
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Posted by on November 20, 2016 in HEALTH

 

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Why we die early

“Man seeks to change the foods available in nature to suit his tastes, thereby putting an end to the very essence of life contained in them.” Sai Baba

By Alex P. Vidal

NEW YORK CITY — As we age we become conscious of the food that we eat primarily because of health reasons.
According to a dietician, we are the food that we eat.
A young college student once asked why people in ancient times lived longer than people in modern times.
My answer was a quick “probably because of the quality of food that they ate.”
Biblical figures lived up to 800 years.
Today, at 60, many of us are already “bog bog sarado” by different ailments and complications; and are frequent visitors in the doctor’s clinics if not confined in the hospitals.
By 70, some of us are wheelchair-bound.
Those lucky to reach 80 stay in bed until the trip to the kingdom come beckons.

CONTAMINATE

Some foods give us diseases because they are contaminated by chemicals and preservatives.
To be healthy, according to health experts, our body needs fuel-foods, fats and carbohydrates (sugars starches) to provide energy; proteins, such as meat, to build new tissues for growth or to replace those worn out; calcium, in milk, for strong bones and teeth; and various minerals, including salt, that help the body to maintain its chemical balance and to carry on its functions.
We learned that vitamins are not foods, but these “food-factors,” as they are called, are essential.
They help the body to make use of the food we eat, doctors say.
Vitamins already present in food are usually enough for a normal person if his diet is otherwise well-balanced, they add.

WHAT TO EAT

Every day we are advised to eat some foods from each of these groups:
(1) milk or milk products, including cheese—at least a pint of milk for an adult and more for a child;
(2) citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruit), tomatoes, or raw cabbage or salad greens—at least one;
(3) green or yellow vegetables, some raw, some cooked—at least one big serving;
(4) other vegetables or fruits, including potatoes;
(5) bread and cereals;
(6) meat, poultry or fish;
(7) eggs—three or four a week at least;
(8) butter or another vitamin-rich spread.
We will all die anyway, so it’s better to make an exit with grace.

 
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Posted by on December 30, 2015 in HEALTH, HISTORY